Leading Through Conservation

Andy & Brian Stickel

Watershed:
Wood County

Water Quality Improvement Summary:


Brothers Andy and Brian Stickel utilize no-till for about 85 percent of the corn and soybeans on their family’s farm. They also plant cereal rye and other cover crops in standing corn stalks for living coverage and soil enrichment. Cover crops and soil testing are effective components of their livestock nutrient management plan.

In an effort to use minimal fertilizer, they plant 15-inch rows of soybeans and 30-inch rows of corn, banding it in the strip 2-3 inches deep on each side of the row ahead of the planter. This method helped eliminate phosphorus and fertilizer applications in the fall.

“We believe in cover crops as a conservation tool. It’s not no-till. We’re building soil health,” said Andy. “We’re trying to use less and less fertilizer and increase cover crops. It’s about finding the right balance.”

Conservation Practices:

  • Cover Crops
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • Variable-Rate Technology
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No-Till
  • Vertical-Till
  • Strip Banding Fertilizer
Brett Davis

Bret Davis

Farm:
Davis Farms
Watershed:
Scioto River and Olentangy River

Water Quality Improvement Summary:


Bret Davis has implemented conservation practices on his family farm to improve its safety and sustainability. Davis Farms utilizes a variety of practices, including buffer strips and variable-rate technology, to keep the nutrients applied to their fields where they were placed.

Focusing on soil health is the most important aspect of the farm’s operations. Davis plans to continue improving soil structure by eliminating compaction, enhancing drainage and ensuring cover crops are keeping the ground covered at all times.

“As best practices change, farmers adapt as soon as we can,” Davis says. “We do everything to be sustainable.”

Conservation Practices:

  • Buffer Strips
  • Waterways
  • Cover crops
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • Variable-Rate Technology
  • Soil Health Monitoring
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No-Till
  • Vertical-Till

John Kraft

Watershed:
Middle Ohio-Laughery

Water Quality Improvement Summary:

John Kraft plants cover crops and utilizes no-till to keep soil in his fields and out of the water. Soil is tested on a three-year rotation to monitor nutrient levels.

He also participates in Farm Service Agency Conservation Reserve Programs that align with his desire to maintain habitat diversity and support wildlife such as wild game and songbirds. Warm season grass buffers have been added along field edges for water quality and approximately 4,000 trees were planted to increase wildlife habitat.

“It’s important because it’s the right thing to do,” said John. “Agriculture tends to get more blame than we should. We’re trying to do better. We need clean water, and we need to do our part.”

Conservation Practices:

  • Buffer Strips
  • Waterways
  • Cover Crops
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No-Till

Other Enhancements:

  • Tree Cover
Ohio Field Leader Farm Conservation Nate Douridas

Nate Douridas, Farm Manager

Farm:
Molly Caren Ag Center
Watershed:
Deer Creek Watershed

Water Quality Improvement Summary:

Nate Douridas is the farm manager for the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, which is home to Ohio’s annual Farm Science Review. Conservation efforts playing a major role in operations. No-till, strip-till and vertical-tillage are all utilized in different areas of the farm along with buffer strips in fields intersected by the Deer Creek. Regular soil testing helps him create the plan for nutrient management, which is applied using Variable Rate Technology (VRT).

Planting dates are critical to ensure crops are ready for harvest during demonstrations at the Farm Science Review in mid-September. Cover crops include reduced rate wheat, oats and Lynx winter pea for easy spring burn down. Water control structures help manage soil moisture as part of the Edge of Field research program. VRT is used for spring planting prescriptions based on soil moisture and drainage capabilities.

Conservation Practices:

  • Buffer Strips
  • Waterways
  • Cover Crops
  • Drainage Water Management Control Structure
  • Variable Rate Technology
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No Till
  • Strip-Till
  • Vertical Till

Bill Knapke

Farm:
Meiring Poultry
Watershed:
Stoney Creek – Wabash River

Water Quality Improvement Summary:


Meiring Poultry has built a reputation for making conservation a priority.  Bill Knapke, who runs the poultry, hog and row crop operation, has implemented several practices to monitor and improve soil and water quality. These include waterways, cover crops and no-till practices to prevent erosion and help hold nutrients in the soil. The farm also features wetlands that help filter and slow down the water to help reduce the flow of nutrients.

They follow a nutrient management plan and Bill utilizes a manure storage facility to hold fertilizer until it can be sold and applied at the right time. In addition, the farm hosts two Edge of Field water monitoring stations to measure nutrient runoff of different farm practices and utilizes an iron slag filter, which catches and retains phosphorous from drainage water.

“We have an opportunity to grow better crops and at the same time help improve water quality and the community that we live in,” said Bill. “We’re just trying to do our part.”  

Conservation Practices:

  • Buffer Strips
  • Waterways
  • Cover Crops
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No Till
  • Water Nutrient Testing/Edge of Field Monitoring
  • Wetlands

Other Enhancements:

  • Iron Slag Phosphorus

Lane Osswald

Farm:
Growing Acres Farms
Watershed:
Twin Creek

Water Quality Improvement Summary:


Lane Osswald and his family utilize several conservation practices, including no-till and cover crops to protect the soil from erosion and prevent nutrient run-off. They also conduct soil tests and use variable rate technology to apply the right nutrients and fertilizers at the right time. As a certified crop advisor, Lane combines initial recommendations from the local co-op and adjusts them based on historical knowledge and farm data. He sees results from these agronomic practices paying off in his field because the soil holds more moisture and withstand dry spells in the summer.

“Overall I think we’re using less nutrients to grow a better crop and the nutrients are going in the right places,” explained Lane. “I’m a fifth-generation farmer, my son is pretty convinced he wants to farm, my nephews will probably want to farm. I believe I can leave the soil in better shape then I found it so they have a better start.”

Conservation Practices

  • Waterways
  • Cover Crops
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • Variable Rate Technology
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No Till

Chris Kurt

Farm:
Kurt Farms
Watershed:
Blanchard River
Water Quality Improvement Summary:

Chris Kurt and his family have utilized conservation practices for more than 20 years. They no till soybeans, use a drainage control structure to shut off field tile in the winter and employ grid soil sampling to help them understand when and where to efficiently apply fertilizer using variable rate technology.

Recently, they elevated their commitment to improving water quality by joining the Blanchard River Demonstration Farm Network. This program will help them test their current practices, identify areas for improvement and share results with other farmers. One of the areas of research includes a two-stage ditch. They will continue their current practices on one side and implement new techniques like no-till corn and cover crops on the other to compare results. They’ve also installed a phosphorous bed to help extract excess phosphorous from water before it leaves the field and plan to do something similar with a nitrate filter.

“We do it to protect the water, but it also helps us get the most out of our soil and nutrients,” said Chris. “If we’re losing nutrients down the river, we’re paying for something we’re not using.”

Conservation Practices

  • Buffer Strips
  • Waterways
  • Cover Crops
  • Drainage Water Management – Control Structure
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • Variable Rate Technology
  • Soil Nutrient Testing
  • No Till

Other Enhancements

  • Phosphorous Removal Bed
  • Nitrate Filter
  • Two-Stage Ditch

Ryan McClure

Farm:
McClure Farms
Watershed:
Prairie Creek
Water Quality Improvement Summary:

Ryan and his family employ a variety of conservation practices including buffer strips along ditches and minimum tillage to help retain moisture and nutrients in the soil. They also use water control structures to help prevent runoff after manure applications and utilize center pivot irrigation systems for precise nitrogen applications to crops.

Several years ago, the McClures volunteered to collaborate with the Ohio Department of Agriculture to host edge-of-field water nutrient testing stations. This helps them understand the true impact of their farm practices on water quality and make improvements for the future.

“We agreed to the edge-of-field water monitoring because we believe it’s important to understand what’s coming off our fields and how much is actually from agriculture when we talk water quality,” said Ryan.

Conservation Practices

  • Buffer Strips
  • Cover Crops
  • Drainage Water Management – Control Structure
  • Nutrient Management (4Rs)
  • No Till/Minimum Tillage

Other Enhancements

  • Water Nutrient Testing / Edge of Field Monitoring
  • Pivot Irrigation Nitrogen Application